AWEJ. Special Issue on Translation No.3 May, 2014                                                                        Pp. 3 – 10

 Abstract PDF

 Full Paper PDF 

Subversion through Self-translation

Said M. Faiq
American University of Sharjah (UAE)
& Exeter University (UK)

Abstract
Although it has been taking place rather quietly, the debate about the author-translator duality remains one of the most interesting and prickly issues in translation studies. The topic becomes more encompassing when it is explored under self-translation. Within this context, the aim of this article is to examine instances from the translation of Autumn of Fury from English into Arabic by the very author of the source text.  The discussion shows how subversion through self-translation manipulates the reading position of the target audience, naturally, for specific purposes.
Keywords: Self-translation, subversion, manipulation, reception

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Said M. Faiq, FRSA, is Professor of intercultural studies and translation at the American
University of Sharjah (UAE), where he was chair/head of department (2003-07, 2009-10), and
director of the graduate program in translation and interpreting (MATI) (2002-11). He is a
visiting professor at Exeter University (UK). Prior to his current position, he worked in Africa,
the Middle East and the United Kingdom (Salford University, (1990-2003), where he was tutor
(director of studies) for undergraduate and graduate programs in Arabic/English translation and
interpreting; and Leeds University, (1996-1998), where he was visiting lecturer). He is an
established figure in the fields of translation, cultural and intercultural studies. He has served as
consultant to private and public organizations for educational and related sectors. He has directed
graduate research in these and allied fields. His publications include Culguage in/of translation
from Arabic (with Ovidi Carbonnel and Ali AlManaa, 2014), Beyond Denotation in Arabic
Translation (with Allen Clark, 2010), Cultures in dialogue: A translational perspective (2010),
Trans-lated: Translation and Cultural Manipulation (2007), Identity and Representation in
Intercultural Communication (2006), Cultural Encounters in Translation from Arabic (2004)