Arab World English Journal (AWEJ) Special Issue on CALL Number 7. July 2021                       Pp.345-358
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.24093/awej/call7.24

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 Informal Digital Learning of English Vocabulary: Saudi EFL Learners’ Attitudes and
Practices

Ghazwan Mohammed Saeed Mohammed
Department of English, College of Sciences and Arts (Alnamas)
University of Bisha, Bisha, Saudi Arabia

Jamal Kaid Mohammed Ali
Department of English, College of Arts, University of Bisha,
Bisha, Saudi Arabia
Corresponding Author: jgmali@ub.edu.sa

  

Received: 5/15/2021             Accepted: 7/20/2021               Published: 7/26/2021

 

Abstract:
Because of the widespread use of digital technology, many EFL students access various types of technologies that help them acquire English vocabulary beyond formal classroom learning. This paper aims to explore Saudi EFL learners’ attitudes towards informal digital learning of English vocabulary (IDLEV) outside the academic requirements as well as their practices of IDLEV beyond the classroom. To answer the research questions of the study, the researchers recruited 80 Saudi EFL students from the University of Bisha, Saudi Arabia, to respond to a self-reported questionnaire. The study found that Saudi EFL students have positive attitudes towards informal digital learning of English in improving their vocabulary. Results also reveal that the participants tend to use different technologies to learn English vocabulary in informal settings. The study found that receptive activities are more commonly used than the productive activities. The study found a significant correlation between learners’ attitudes and practices. The implications of the study and recommendations were presented accordingly.
Keywords: attitudes and practices, English vocabulary, extramural English, informal digital learning, Saudi EFL learners

Cite as: Mohammed, G. M. S., & Ali, J. K. M.    (2021). Informal Digital Learning of English Vocabulary: Saudi EFL Learners’ Attitudes and Practices .
Arab World English Journal (AWEJ) Special Issue on CALL (7) 345-358.
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.24093/awej/call7.24

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Dr. Ghazwan Mohammed Saeed Mohammed obtained his PhD in Applied Linguistics from Aligarh Muslim University, India. He is currently an Assistant Professor of Linguistics at the Department of English, College of Sciences and Arts, Alnamas, University of Bisha, KSA, and a permanent Faculty member of the Department of English, Faculty of Arts, Thamar University, Yemen. His research interests include Applied Linguistics, Syntax, Grammar, language learning, Error Analysis and Translation. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8853-9013

Jamal Kaid Mohammed Ali is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics, College of Arts, University of Bisha, Saudi Arabia. Ali studied at Hodiedah University, Yemen and graduated with a Bachelor degree in English Language. In 2008, he got MA English (Linguistics) degree from EFLU, Hyderabad, India. In May 2012, He got PhD degree in Linguistics from Aligarh Muslim University, India. His research interests include texting, learning language skills, motivation (SDT), anxiety, E-learning and informal digital learning. He is an e-learning and Quality Matters Reviewer. He got certificates from Quality Matters (QM) on Applying the Quality Matter Rubric Peer Reviewer Course and Master Reviewer Certification. https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3079-5580