Arab World English Journal (AWEJ) Special Issue on CALL Number 6. July 2020                              Pp102 -113
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.24093/awej/call6.7

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Writing for Journal Publications: A Case Study of Eight Computer Scientists in Algeria

Anissa Cheriguene
Department of Letters and English Language, University of Ouargla
Ouargla, Algeria
Department of English, ENS of Laghouat, Laghouat, Algeria
Kebbache Tayeb
Department of English, ENS of Laghouat, Laghouat, Algeria

Chaker Abdelaziz Kerrache
3Department of Mathematics and Computer Science,
University of Ghardaia, Ghardaia, Algeria

 

Abstract:
Journal publications written in English are a sina qua non condition for national and international recognition. Recent literature in applied linguistics and other fields has denounced the existence of some conventions and “rules” that govern a given research writing. That is, using a concise, clear and error-free language is demanded in order to increase accessibility and ease of understanding. With the aid of textual descriptive analysis, this paper attempts to review the most common linguistic reasons behind papers’ rejection. Eight papers of Ph.D. computer science students were collected and analyzed qualitatively in order to diagnose the main problems and challenges Ph.D. students  face while writing for scholarly publication. Other than other linguistic lacunes, it is found out that the authors had problems mainly with using the right tone, choosing the correct words and the adequate tense use. Indeed, the results of this study are supposed to be of some use to writers who want to know what writing  conventions, if there are any, are adequate for paper publication. Finally, some recommendations related to students’ problems in writing for scholarly publication are made.
Keywords: Scientific writing, linguistic conventions, journal publication, revisions

Cite as:  Cheriguene, A.,Tayeb, K.,&  Kerrache, C.A.(2020). Writing for Journal Publications: A Case Study of Eight Computer Scientists in Algeria. Arab World English Journal (AWEJ) Special Issue on CALL (6). Pp102 – 113.
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.24093/awej/call6.7

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Anissa Cheriguene is a lecturer and a Ph.D. student currently at the Department of English
Language and Literature, University of Ouargla, Ouargla, Algeria, and the Department of English,
ENS of Laghouat, Laghouat, Algeria. Her research interests are mainly related to English as a
Second Language writing for journal publications flipped classrooms, end educational technology.