Arab World English Journal (AWEJ) Special Issue on Covid 19 Challenges April 2021                     Pp.199-208
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.24093/awej/covid.15

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 Virtual Mini-Lecture in Distance Learning Space 

Olena Palatovska
Department of Russian Language and Literature, Faculty of Slavic Philology,
Kyiv National Linguistic University (KNLU), Kyiv, Ukraine 

Mariana Bondar
Department of Russian Language and Literature, Faculty of Slavic Philology,
Kyiv National Linguistic University (KNLU), Kyiv, Ukraine 

Olga Syniavska
Department of Russian Language and Literature, Faculty of Slavic Philology,
Kyiv National Linguistic University (KNLU), Kyiv, Ukraine
Corresponding Author: olga.sinyavskaya1989@gmail.com 

Oleksandr Muntian
Department of Russian Language and Literature, Faculty of Slavic Philology,
Kyiv National Linguistic University (KNLU), Kyiv, Ukraine

 

Received: 2/21/2021                  Accepted:  4/3/2021                     Published: 4/26/2021  

Abstract:
The COVID-19 pandemic has fundamentally affected all the spheres of human life, including education. Universities worldwide have established distance learning, which demanded combining and improving both traditional and innovative education forms. The article offers a comprehensive analysis of pre-recorded mini-lectures in the educational space of distance learningfor different scientific-educational Internet projects (Coursera, PostNauka, Udacity, edX, LinguaLeo, EdEra, etc.). Mini-lectures are complete pieces of speech limited in time and accessible to multiple reproductions; that is why they are quite a representative material for the research of the generation of cognitive processes and perception of a verbal educational message in asynchronous online learning. The significant results of the study include: the definition of invariable characteristics of virtual mini-lectures (distance, virtuality, mediation, situational incorrigibility, multimodality), defining cognitive strategies of the speaker and the listener in an asynchronous lecture interaction, finding the points of contact (motivation and interest in transferring and receiving information) between them. The article also describes the linguistic features of virtual mini-lecture. These conclusions can find practical application in the development of methodology for the distance teaching of linguistic disciplines.
Keywords: asynchronous оnline learning, cognitive strategies, distance learning, invariable
characteristics, lecture interaction, scientific-educational discourse, virtual mini-lecture

Cite as: Palatovska, O., Bondar, M., Syniavska, O., &  Muntian, O.  (2021). Virtual Mini-Lecture in Distance Learning Space.
Arab World English Journal (AWEJ) Special Issue on Covid 19 Challenges (1) 199-208.
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.24093/awej/covid.15

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Olena Palatovska, Doctor of Science (Philology), Associate Professor, Head of the Department of Russian Language and Literature, Faculty of Slavic Philology, Kyiv National Linguistic University, Ukraine. Research interests: cognitive linguistics, discourse analysis, complex sentence syntax, cross-cultural studies, foreign language teaching. ORCID ID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6084-6505

Mariana Bondar, Ph.D. in Philology, Associate Professor at the Department of Russian Language and Literature, Faculty of Slavic Philology, Kyiv National Linguistic University, Ukraine. Research interests: theory and practice of translation, intercultural communication, turkish studies, foreign language teaching.  ORCID ID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2463-6308

Olga Syniavska, Ph.D. in Philology, Associate Professor at the Department of Russian Language and Literature, Faculty of Slavic Philology, Kyiv National Linguistic University, Ukraine. Research interests: mass-media communication, cognitive linguistics, onomasiology, foreign language teaching.  ORCID ID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3241-1854

Oleksandr Muntian, Ph.D. in Philology, Associate Professor at the Department of Russian Language and Literature, Dean of the Faculty of Slavic Philology, Kyiv National Linguistic University, Ukraine. Research interests: historical linguistics, Russian studies, cross-cultural studies, foreign language teaching.  ORCID ID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7004-0249