Arab World English Journal (AWEJ) Special Issue on CALL Number 6. July 2020                             Pp. 191- 211
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.24093/awej/call6.13

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  Using Blended Learning to Support the Teaching of English as a Foreign Language

 

Hebah Asaad Hamza Sheerah
English Department, Faculty of Language and Translation
Abha, King Khalid University, Saudi Arabia

 

 

 

Abstract:
The recent development in the field of technology in education has led to renewed interest in blending traditional methods of teaching with technology which might enhance language teaching and learning. The purpose of this paper is to review the literature concerning the strengths and weaknesses of blended learning as a technology-enhanced pedagogical tool that combines online and face-to-face instructional activities, on the development of English skills, inclusive of its use in the teaching of English as a Foreign Language (EFL). Furthermore, this article sheds new light on how blended learning allows the learner to become autonomous and engaged in the construction the knowledge, rather than acting as passive absorbers. It is expected that this paper will contribute to enhancing the body of knowledge that exists in the area of blended learning, especially as it applies to the issue of the acquisition of experience in English as a foreign language. It can be concluded that the use of blended learning has the potential to support EFL learning and maximize EFL learners’ opportunities to practice the English language freely at their convenience. There are issues which need to be addressed and, or resolved, such as ensuring that the library facilities are capable of delivering this type of approach, online materials are suitably supportive of the students needed to access them, and the design of blended learning approaches take account of the preferred learning methods of students, and the workload required to be successful.
Keywords: blended learning, distance education, English as a Foreign Language (EFL), face-to-face learning, flexibility, self-directed learners, technology-enhanced learning

Cite as:   Sheerah, H. A. H. (2020). Using Blended Learning to Support the Teaching of English as a Foreign Language. Arab World English Journal (AWEJ) Special Issue on CALL (6).191- 211.  DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.24093/awej/call6.13 

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Hebah Asaad Hamza Sheerah is currently an Assistant Professor in (TESOL) Teaching
English to speakers of other languages at the department of English, Faculty of Language and
Translation, King Khalid University, Abha, Saudi Arabia since 2019. In October 2018, she got a
Ph.D. degree from Reading University, UK. She previously worked in Taiba University, Saudi
Arabia for four years. Her areas of interest include blended learning, Language & Education,
Teaching & learning, curriculum development, and collaborative learning. She has participated
in many international conferences.