Arab World English Journal (AWEJ) Volume. 8 Number. 4 December 2017                                         Pp. 365-383
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.24093/awej/vol8no4.25

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Tongue Twister, Students’ Pronunciation Ability, and Learning Styles

Fatchul Mu’in
English Department, Faculty of Teacher Training and Education
Universitas Lambung Mangkurat, Banjarmasin, Indonesia

 Rosyi Amrina
English Department, Faculty of Teacher Training and Education
Universitas Lambung Mangkurat, Banjarmasin, Indonesia

Rizky Amelia
English Department, Faculty of Teacher Training and Education
Universitas Lambung Mangkurat, Banjarmasin, Indonesia

 

 

Abstract:
In EFL context, considering appropriate technique in teaching pronunciation is a pivotal issue since it could help students to learn how to pronounce English sounds easy. This study aimed to investigate the effect of tongue twister technique on pronunciation ability of students across different learning styles. This study involved 34 first-year English major students taking Intensive English course at Universitas Lambung Mangkurat, one of leading universities in Indonesia. The students in the experimental group were taught by using tongue twister, while those in the control group were taught by using repetition technique. The students were also grouped based on two types of learning styles, namely active and reflective learning styles referring to Felder and Silverman’s (1988) learning style model. The findings of the study showed that there was no significant difference in pronunciation ability between the groups. No significant difference was either found in pronunciation ability between students with active learning style and those with reflective learning style. In spite of the insignificant results, tongue twister is considered beneficial by the students as they perceived that practicing tongue twisters cultivated joyful learning and it helped them to improve their pronunciation, fluency, and motivation in learning English pronunciation. Tongue twister practice could complement the use of repetition technique to enhance students’ learning experience and learning outcome.
Keywords: active, learning styles, pronunciation, reflective, tongue twister

Cite as: Mu’in, F., Rosy Amrina, R., &  Amelia, R.  (2017). Tongue Twister, Students’ Pronunciation Ability, and Learning Styles.
Arab World English Journal, 8 (4).
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.24093/awej/vol8no4.25

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Fatchul Mu’in is a Lecturer in Literature/ Linguistics at Universitas Lambung Mangkurat,
Banjarmasin, South Kalimantan, Indonesia. He earned his Master of Humanities from
Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia and Doctoral degree from Universitas Negeri
Malang, East Java, Indonesia.