Arab World English Journal (AWEJ) Special Issue on CALL Number 7. July 2021                  Pp.178 189
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.24093/awej/call7.13

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 Multimodality and Digital Narrative in Teaching a Foreign Language 

Svitlana Fedorenko
Department of Theory, Practice and Translation of the English Language,
Faculty of Linguistics, National Technical University of Ukraine
“Igor Sikorsky Kyiv Polytechnic Institute”, Kyiv, Ukraine
Corresponding Author: 4me@ukr.net

Iryna Voloshchuk
Department of Theory, Practice and Translation of the English Language,
Faculty of Linguistics, National Technical University of Ukraine
“Igor Sikorsky Kyiv Polytechnic Institute”, Kyiv, Ukraine

Yuliia Sharanova
Department of Theory, Practice and Translation of the English Language,
Faculty of Linguistics, National Technical University of Ukraine
“Igor Sikorsky Kyiv Polytechnic Institute”, Kyiv, Ukraine

Nataliia Glinka
Department of Theory, Practice and Translation of the English Language,
Faculty of Linguistics, National Technical University of Ukraine
“Igor Sikorsky Kyiv Polytechnic Institute”, Kyiv, Ukraine 

Kateryna Zhurba
Laboratory of moral, civic and intercultural education,
Institute of Problems on Education,
National Academy of Educational Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv, Ukraine

 

Received:  3/28/2021                        Accepted: 7/1/2021                           Published: 7/26/2021

 Abstract:
The article focuses on the authors’ pedagogical experience of exploiting digital narratives in a foreign language education at a modern university (on the basis of National Technical University of Ukraine “KPI” named after Igor Sikorsky). The study aims to consider multimodality in terms of foreign language didactics. It was designed by the constructivism theory and narratology in terms of teaching a foreign language. The research exploited the set of theoretical methods: analyzing, summarizing, and interpreting scholarly sources on the issue under scrutiny; generalization and conceptualization of the authors’ pedagogical experience. Applying those methods in coherence logic enabled the effective study and interpretation of the concepts of “narrative” and “digital narrative” in their interrelations. In the study, the narrative is viewed as a sociocultural tool that provides students with deeper self-understanding, and complements the communicative system of foreign language acquisition with metacognition and values of life meaning. The digital narrative as a form of expression, empowered and determined by digital technologies incorporates multimodal communication and narrative as a cognitive unity. The authors have stated that multimodality, grounded on information technologies, is introducing entirely new semiotic resources into the communicative environment of foreign language learning. It is also generating innovative ways and forms of oral and written interaction. Multimodal learning activities illustrating the specifics of creating digital narratives by learners of English as a foreign language, are highlighted. The significance of the study lies in the fact that the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic is unquestionably a rather fertile condition for  active implementing digital technologies into foreign language education, and developing different multimodal learning activities in this area
Keywords: digital competence, digital narrative, multimodality, multimodal learning activity, narrative, teaching a foreign language.

Cite as: Fedorenko, S., Voloshchuk, I., Sharanova, Y., Glinka, N., &  Zhurba, K. (2021). Multimodality and Digital Narrative in Teaching a Foreign Language.  Arab World English Journal (AWEJ) Special Issue on CALL (7)178 189.
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.24093/awej/call7.13

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Svitlana Fedorenko is a professor at the Department of Theory, Practice and Translation of the English Language. She gained her degree of Habilitated Doctor of Pedagogical Sciences from the National Academy of Pedagogical Sciences of Ukraine. Her research interests include: modern trends in higher education, intercultural communication, multimodal education.ORCID ID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3679-9673

Iryna Voloshchuk is an Associate Professor at the Department of Theory, Practice and Translation of the English Language. Her research interests include, learning design, muili modal communication, and teaching English as a foreign language. ORCID ID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1487-4732

Yuliia Sharanova – gained her PhD in Pedagogical Sciences from Kyiv National Pedagogical Academy and now is a teacher at the Department of Theory, Practice and Translation of the English Language. Her research interests include multicultural education, cross-cultural communication, and teaching English as a foreign language. ORCID ID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7971-4465

Nataliia Glinka – Associate Professor of the department of Theory, Practice and Translation of the English Language. She is a graduate of the National University “Kyiv-Mohyla Academy” and post-graduate student of this university. She completed an internship at Charles University in Prague and Cambridge. Her research interests” History of World Literature” and “Theory of the text and its interpretation.
ORCID ID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7249-3615

Kateryna Zhurba  – Doctor of Educational sciences, Senior Researcher, Chief Research Fellow, laboratories for moral, civic and intercultural education Institute of Problems on Education of the National Academy of Educational Sciences of Ukraine. Her research interests moral, civic and intercultural education. ORCID ID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3854-4033