Arab World English Journal (AWEJ) Volume 13. Number 4 December 2022                                Pp.412-426
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.24093/awej/vol13no4.27

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Genre-Based Analysis of Selected Political Debates: A Discourse Analysis Study

Muruj Basim Issa
Department of English, College of Education for Women
University of Baghdad, Baghdad, Iraq
Corresponding Author: morouj.bassem1203a@coeduw.uobaghdad.edu.iq

Nawal Fadhil Abbas
Department of English, College of Education for Women
University of Baghdad, Baghdad, Iraq
Email: nawal_fa71@yahoo.com

 

Received:06/25/2022         Accepted: 11/22/2022                Published: 12/15/2022

 

Abstract:
The researchers of the present study have conducted a genre analysis of two political debates between American presidential nominees in the 2016 and 2020 elections. The current study seeks to analyze the cognitive construction of political debates to evaluate the typical moves and strategies politicians use to express their communicative intentions and to reveal the language manifestations of those moves and strategies.  To achieve the study’s aims, the researchers adopt Bhatia’s (1993) framework of cognitive construction supported by van Emeren’s (2010) pragma-dialectic framework. The study demonstrates that both presidents adhere to this genre structuring to further their political agendas. For a positive and promising image, presidents focus on highlighting domestic and international issues to reflect leadership. On the other hand, highlighting controversies and defense strategies appear to be prominent in debate in consensus with the contemplative nature of this genre. Discoursal devices like polarized lexicalization and actor description are vital in orienting the controversies and influence with the aid of in-group pronouns, representative speech acts, and national/self-glorification.
Keywords: Bhatia, discourse analysis, moves, political debates, Pragma- Dialectic

Cite as:  Issa.M. B., &  Abbas, N. F. (2022). Genre-Based Analysis of Selected Political Debates: A Discourse Analysis Study
Arab World English Journal, 13 (4) 412-426.
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.24093/awej/vol13no4.27

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Received: 06/25/2022
Accepted: 11/22/2022 
Published: 12/15/2022 
http://orcid.org/0000-0003-1692-557X
https://dx.doi.org/10.24093/awej/vol13no4.27 

Muruj Basim Issa is an M.A. candidate in the Department of English, University of Baghdad, College of Education for Women. ORCiD ID: http://orcid.org/0000-0003-1692-557X

 Nawal Fadhil Abbas is a professor with a Ph.D. in English Language and Linguistics teaching in the Department of English, University of Baghdad, College of Education for Women. ORCiD ID: http://orcid.org//0000-0003-2608-6909