Arab World English Journal (AWEJ) Volume 9. Number 3. September 2018                                   Pp. 381-389
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.24093/awej/vol9no3.25

Abstract PDF

Full Paper PDF

Developing Plagiarism Policies in EFL Contexts: A Saudi Arabian Focus 

Sulaiman Jenkins
English Language Department
College of Applied and Supporting Studies
King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals
Dhahran, Saudi Arabia  

 

 

Abstract:
This commentary responds to the approach used in establishing a plagiarism policy for preparatory year students at a medical university in Saudi Arabia. While appropriating others’ ideas and passing them off as one’s own is considered unethical in Western academia, the concept of textual ownership varies from culture to culture. Thus, this paper investigates the pedagogical and academic currency of establishing plagiarism policies in English as a foreign language (EFL) contexts (and Saudi Arabia specifically) without accounting for the role local writing traditions and culture play in academia. Whereas much previous literature has examined plagiarism policies situated in English as a second language (ESL) contexts, this paper examines challenges that may be particular to EFL contexts and lays out a framework for establishing plagiarism policies therein.
Keywords: academic integrity, contrastive rhetoric, intercultural rhetoric, plagiarism, second language writing, textual ownership

Cite as:  Jenkins, S. (2018).  Developing Plagiarism Policies in EFL Contexts: A Saudi Arabian Focus.
Arab World English Journal, 9 (3), 381-389.
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.24093/awej/vol9no3.25

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on tumblr
Tumblr
Share on reddit
Reddit
Share on email
Email
Share on stumbleupon
StumbleUpon
Share on digg
Digg
https://dx.doi.org/10.24093/awej/vol9no3.25
Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on tumblr
Share on digg
Share on email
Share on reddit
Share on stumbleupon
Share on vk

Sulaiman Jenkins is an American teaching at a petroleum university in Saudi Arabia. He
completed his MA in TESOL at New York University and has been teaching in Saudi Arabia for
14 years. His research interests include the relationship between culture and language, learner
identity, sociolinguistics, native speakerism, and intercultural rhetoric and he has published
numerous articles related to monolingualism, environmental concerns, and discrimination. At the
time of writing this article he was working at a medical university in Riyadh.
His ORCID ID is 0000-0002-5633-9711