Arab World English Journal (AWEJ) Vol.6. No.4 December  2015                                               Pp. 408-418

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Can the Subaltern Communicate?

Mohamed BELAMGHARI
University Mohamed I, Oujda, Morocco

 

 

Abstract:
 Following Gayatri Spivak’s Controversial essay, “can the subaltern Speak?” a host of debates have come to the fore as regards whether or not the subaltern voice can speak at all, especially after the era of independence. Of course, Spivak has her reasons to answer the question she raises in the negative, but other writers (I take the example of Moroccans) have proven that they can speak and they actually have spoken in their writings though the means whereby the speech is conducted is Western. In this sense, my contribution addresses the question of the subaltern voice in some post-colonial literary works, especially of the Moroccans, and the extent to which this voice is able or abled to speak. This is seen into especially through the content of what the subaltern voice says and the literary techniques employed in speaking its mind.
Key Words: Abrogation, appropriation, discourse, the subaltern

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Dr. Mohamed Belamghari, University of Mohamed the First, Oujda – Morocco. His
specialty:Critical Theory, Moroccan Literature, Culture & Civilization, Cultural Sociology
Colonial and Post-colonial Studies.He is the author of a book titled, Regimenting Americanism:
a short cut into a Dialogical Globe.