Arab World English Journal (AWEJ) Special Issue on CALL Number 6. July 2020                          Pp.38-48
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.24093/awej/call6.3

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 Сomputer Technologies in Acoustic Analysis of English Television Advertising Discourse

 

Olga Valigura
Department of Oriental Philology
Kyiv National Linguistic University, Ukraine

Liubov Kozub
Romance and Germanic Languages and Translation Department
 National University of Life and Environmental Sciences of Ukraine, Ukraine

Iryna Sieriakova
Department of Foreign Languages
Kyiv National Linguistic University, Ukraine

 

 

 

Abstract:
Research studies in a variety of linguistic areas indicate that scholars often refer to computer technologies that become popular as a tool to reinforce the findings and provide the validity of the experimental results. This paper discusses the use of computer technologies in the acoustic analysis of speech prosody focused on the English television advertising discourse. The article aims to determine what the main prosodic characteristics of English advertising discourse are, and how they contribute to the maximum influence on the television audience. Therefore, the study relies upon the acoustic analysis using sound processing software WaveLab, Cool Edit Pro, SpectraLAB, Wasp, Sound Forge to ensure the reliability and validity of the obtained results. Moreover, the computer programs used in this research allowed us to measure the pronunciation accuracy and present results based on many experimental data, not only on the assumptions. Besides, the linguistic interpretation of the data of the perceptual and acoustic analysis of the English television advertising discourse prosody proves a strong correlation of these data. The obtained results indicate that detailed analysis of the quantitative prosodic characteristics of speech enables to get a clear picture of the prosodic organization of the English television advertising discourse. The research proves that the prosody of the English advertising discourse closely correlates with its pragmatic potential and some sociolinguistic features, namely, the social status of the viewer, contribute to the maximum influence on the television audience.
Keywords: Acoustic analysis, English advertising discourse, pragmatic potential, prosody, sound processing software 

Cite as. Valigura, O., Kozub, L., & Sieriakova, I.(2020). Сomputer Technologies in Acoustic Analysis of English Television Advertising Discourse. Arab World English Journal (AWEJ) Special Issue on CALL (6). 38-48.    DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.24093/awej/call6.3

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Olga Valigura, DSc. in Philology, Chair at the Department of Oriental Philology, Kyiv National
Linguistic University. Her research interests include: experimental phonetics, research of speech
communication, sociophonetics, cross-cultural studies, bilingualism.
ORCID ID: http://orcid.org/0000-0003-0428-5421

Liubov Kozub, PhD in Philology, Associate Professor at Romance and Germanic Languages and
Translation Department, National University of Life and Environmental Sciences of Ukraine. Her
research interests are: experimental phonetics, sociolinguistics, pragmalinguistics, text linguistics.
ORCID ID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-6617-6442

Iryna Sieriakova, DSc. in Philology, Professor of Linguistics at the Department of Foreign
Languages, Kyiv National Linguistic University. Her research interests include: discourse
analysis, pragmatics of discursive practices, non-verbal semiotics, cross-cultural studies.
ORCID ID: http://orcid.org/0000-0001-6446-7070